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Horse Pal@ Horsefly Trap

Horse Fly Trap

by Neil Newman

Spring is just around the corner and that means fly season. There are methods of controlling flies that lay eggs in manure. There are controls for flies that are attracted to chemical baits. There are controls for flies that pass through your horse's intestines. Until now, there has not been any control for the vicious biting horse flies and the advice has generally been to wait out horsefly season. What can be done????

There are over thirty species of blood-feeding horse flies (insect family Tabanidae), known by several different names. By any name they are vicious, painful biters, making life miserable for horses and people. Horse fly bites are more than an annoyance. They can transmit disease, including Equine Infectious Anemia, Potomac Horse Fever, and possibly Lyme Disease (New England Journal of Medicine 322: 17:52 1990)

The fly's sharp mouth parts saw through the skin of the victim making a bleeding wound which allows the fly to suck blood. Like the mosquito only the female bites to feed on blood.

Horse flies (deer flies are similar) deposit egg masses, usually on vegetation over moist soil or near water, where the larva burrow into moist soil or the bottoms of ponds or streams. They are also able to burrow into dry soil. Larva feed on organic matter or insects, worms etc., maturing in late spring.

 

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FIBER TESTING:

Alpaca Consulting USA

Alpaca Fiber Testing USA

 

THE STATE-OF-THE-ART FIBER TESTS

Have your animals’ fiber tested with state-of-the-art equipment. The OFDA2000 is the world’s
first portable computerized fiber measurement instrument. It is the most advanced fiber testing system available, offering you comprehensive information for every animal in your herd.

INSTRUCTIONS

Send a one inch square sample of your animal’s fiber, taken from the mid-side (blanket), kept in
the same configuration as when cut. Cut as close to the skin as you can. Place the sample in a
baggie and identify it with your farm’s name and address, the name or number of the animal, date
of birth and the date the sample was taken (often your last shearing).

 

WHAT YOU GET

A histogram giving you the mean fiber diameter (microns) for the entire sample length, as
well as such important data as Comfort Factor, Standard Deviation and more.
A graph that tells you the day-to-day history of the animal through the length of the sample.
It tells you if the animal is over-fed, if it has medical problems, if it has been stressed.

 

OR...

 

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